New York Public Libraries
Cities P-S
Pawling (Akin Library)

This is not the Pawling Free Library. Located on Quaker Hill, this is now known as Akin Free Library. It contains a museum and the Library.

 

Albertype postcard.

Pine Hill (Morton Memorial Library)

'Artino' brand postcard includes Catskill Mountains in its caption.

 

1903 Greek Revival building. Still in use.

Pleasantville

Now part of the Mount Pleasant Public Library.

 

Shingle-style architecture, rare in the library world.

 

The card, by the Tecraft Company, looks more like a book cover illustration than a library postcard.

Poughkeepsie (Adriance Memorial Library)

(L) Card by J. Ruben of Newburgh.
The retoucher enhanced the dome's
resemblance to a muskmelon.

(R) German postcard.

 

The Library is quite clearly still in use.

Raquette Lake

Still in use, but with somewhat limited hours.

The young pines seen on this linen finish postcard have grown into a lovely wooded setting for this Adirondack Mountain library.

Postcard by the Standard Supply Company. Oh, that's what the S.S. stands for.

Red Hook

Building designed by Orson Squire Fowler.

The library took over the house in 1935. New York and New England seem to have a lot of libraries utilizing former mansions.

Remsen (Didymus Thomas Memorial Library)

Remains in this handsome building, but open for very limited hours (2015).

 

Its publisher was S.S. Company Quality Cards, an unfamiliar marque.

Rensselaerville

Its history dates back to 1798. This version was founded in 1896 and incorporated in 1921. Expanded in 1996  

 

The postcard image was taken by Janet Long Haseley as a benefit. It must have worked well, because the expanded library is very attractive.

 

 

Rhinebeck

No longer used as a library, but serves as a community house today.

Wow, this is a confusing card. Rhinebock is crossed off, and Rhinecliff is stamped above the error. Most Internet sources call the location Rhinebeck.
Valentine and Sons couldn't get it right. The mailing post office is Rhine Cliff.

 

Let's just call it Morton Memorial Hall and Library.

Richfield Springs

Part of the Four County Library System.
There's not a lot of information out there about this library's history. As Proctor was a prominent citizen, it looks as if his role may have been in deeding the land to the village.

 

This is a lovely Albertype postcard.

There is a 1920-1945 series of photo postcards of the interior of this library. Many overlap, and none is particularly fetching, except from a dry, academic viewpoint.

Rochester
Reynolds Library

In 1892, Mortimer Reynolds passed, leaving his mansion to serve as Rochester's library. It was opened as a true public library in 1911, and served until 1936.

This entire back postcard was mailed in 1909.

Rundell Memorial Building

Metropolitan card, mailed 1953.

 

A touch of Deco.

Now joined by the Bausch & Lomb Public Library Building to comprise the headquarters of the Monroe County Library System.

Be certain to catch their excellent history page.

Rome (Jervis Public Library)

I believe this to be the original, intact building, John B. Jervis' home, which was converted to a public library in 1895, and upsized in 1925.
Yes, I'm aware that no-one upsized anything in 1925.
It was enlarged yet again in 1961, 1972, and 1988.

 

Wm. Jubb card.

This arty Plastichrome card shows at least two of the additions mentioned above. It might even be an architect's rendering.

 

It does tell us who John Jervis was: the engineer who planned the water systems for both Boston and New York City.

Rouse's Point (Dodge Memorial Library)

Chartered in 1906. This building is still in use.

This is a relatively new Fairbanks Card Company postcard.

Rye

Now called the Rye Free Reading Room.
The building had additions in 1951, 1960, and 2003.

 

(L) Photo & Art Postal Card. The art part is a little dubious.

(R) Dexter Press/Pendor Natural Color postcard, mailed in 1966.

St. Johnsville (Margaret Reaney Memorial Library)

(L) J.A. Smith card.

(R) 1944 Curt Teich linen-finish postcard.

 

Built in 1909, and still in use after a 1936 addition.

Salem

Why the strange frame style?

Well, the building burned halfway in 1976, and only the first floor was salvaged. That remainder is still being used: the video at the link shows how it was done. Three-fourths of the collection was lost.

 

Unattributed card mailed in 1906.

 

Saranac Lake

Still in use: the library's web site is somewhat rudimentary, but at least it has pictures.

 

The photo was taken by Bob Kampf for Northern Adironack Views, printed by Dexter Press.

Saratoga Springs

(L) Tichnor Quality View.
(R) From Dean Color Services.
Kodachrome by Byrhl F. Wheeler.

From the reverse of the chrome card:

Built and chartered in 1950 as a School District Public Library. Now supported by the City. Building cost $125,000 from private donations. Over 30,000 modern titles. ...

 

Sherburne

(L) Published for the Greeting Card Mfg. Co. Never mailed.
(R) B.G. Lowry Aerial Photo Service card.

Originated as part of Sherburne Free Academy. Current building designed by Edward Tilton in 1909. Its current roof is green tile, and it was built using red brick.
South wing added, 1939; renovations, 2002.

Skaneateles

Built from a 1888 Green & Wicks plan, the library opened in 1890. The art gallery function was added in 1900. Formerly an independent library, Skaneateles Library is now more efficient and effective as part of the Onondaga County Library System.

The Curt Teich linen finish postcard dates to 1948.

Suffern

Replaced by a beautiful building: I don't know the fate of this one.

 

Artvue Post Card.

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Founded in 1884. The Reynolds family also assisted with Rochester's Athenaeum and Mechanics' Association.

©2015-2019  Judy Aulik
Contact me at (my first name) at roadmaps (dot) org.

 

Scanned images are provided in the spirit of scholarly study. Most are of an age to be in the public domain. However, if you use my scans, please credit this site.