Carnegie Libraries of Massachusetts

Cities M-Z

Marlborough

(L) American Art Post card Company's 'Photolux' marque.
(R) Rotograph postcard captioned as Public Library, Marlboro, Mass. Melvil Dui would be proud.

 

1902 grant. Still in use, with a huge addition.

Melrose

(L) Unattractive, but very old, postcard mailed in 1904.
(R) Beautiful Rotograph card, never mailed.

 

1901 grant: still in use.

(R) This postcard style is nicknamed "Copper Window," for the metallic ink used in each window. The image used by Reichner Bros. is quite similar to the Rotograph card above.

Needham

1903 grant. Demolished sometime after 1950, when this postcard was sent. I presume it was defaced at that time.

The card, not the library.

Revere

1901 grant. Opened 1903, in Georgian Revival/American Renaissance style, with every last detail from both.

The E.M. Copeland postcard was mailed in 1908.

Rockland

(L) Library and Vietnam Memorial, by Country Colour. Deckle edge cropped.
(R) Raphael Tuck & Sons' Post Card, printed in Germany.

 

1903 grant; building still in use today. It looks like it was essentially untouched for ca. 35 years.

Rockport

(L) If you're fascinated by right sides of libraries, this is the card for you. Albertype card, mailed 1944. Definitely Albertype's quality was beginning to suffer.
(R) Metropolitan News card, almost ethereal in quality.

 

 

Also a 1903 grant. According to Corinne Smith, this building was converted to a private residence. Unfortunately, this was right at the time the US economy sank (2007), so the building went up for sale once again. Said to be a private home.

Saugus

1916 grant: demolished some time after its 1996 replacement.
By the way, like so many public libraries which demolished their Carnegie buildings, Saugus Public Library does not 'fess up to it either.

 

Edward Wells postcard, mailed in 1942.

 

Somerville
Central

Built in 1907; still in use. 

This is a Curt Teich 'C.T. American Art' postcard, printed in 1914.

West

Somerville received a 1907 grant for three buildings. I lack the East branch.

1907 grant: still in use.

 

The postcard is captioned 'West Somerville,' yet it's clearly the same library building as on this page.

Springfield

Preceded by an 1871 building.

(L) Architect's rendering on a Geo. S. Graves postcard. Caption:

New City Library now being erected on State Street. Cost, $325,000. Length, 223 feet. Depth, 87 feet. Materials, white marble with terra cotta frieze, and green tile roof.

(R) Early  Albertype card, never mailed.

As with the New York Public Library, postcards exist of the Springfield main library long before (1910) its completion (dedicated in 1912).
The building is still in use and restored in 1998.

Forest Park Library

(L) Unattributed.

(R) Hugh C. Leighton card, mailed in 1910.

Indian Orchard

The Indian Orchard neighborhood branch was built in 1909 in Classical Revival manner.

Memorial Square

This Tichnor Bros. postcard appears to be that of the Memorial Square Branch, but it's coloring is a bit too exuberant for me to be certain. Both the Central and the Memorial Square branches (still extant) are a greyish-beige.

Stoneham

Built in 1904: required its first (Brown) addition in 1931, built by Coolidge and Carlson. Still in use.

The attractive tinted postcard was made by Robbins Bros., and was never mailed.

Taunton

1902 Carnegie grant. Still in use.

 

A.C. Bosselman card.

Turners Falls

1903 Carnegie grant. Still in use.

(L) Litho-chrome brand card, mailed in 1908.

(R) German postcard, also mailed in 1908.

Can't accuse either firm of poaching, can we?

Walpole

1901 grant. Surprisingly, still in use, with renovations and remodeling.

Herbert W. Rhodes postcard, mailed in 1906. It certainly isn't a good postcard, but it will serve.

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©2015-2019  Judy Aulik
Contact me at (my first name) at roadmaps (dot) org.

 

Scanned images are provided in the spirit of scholarly study. Most are of an age to be in the public domain. However, if you use my scans, please credit this site.