Public Libraries of Massachusetts

Cities T-Z

Whew!  Almost done with this state, unless you want to go to Boston.

Tyringham

(L) An attractive linen-finish card of a single storey stone library.
(R) E.L. Tinker monochrome card, mailed 1908.

 

Little Internet presence. Appears to share the pictured building with the town hall.

Uxbridge (Thayer Memorial Library)

Someone was channeling Jolly Olde England, I think.
Donated in 1893. Still in use.

 

(L) RPPC mailed 1906.

(R) Octochrome brand card by The American News Company.

Vineyard Haven

No longer in use as a library.

Vineyard Haven is a village on Martha's Vineyard. The Libray building is the shingle-style building on the left side of the postcard.

1905 postcard by Rotograph.

Wakefield (Beebe Memorial Library)

Founded in 1856, although this 1922 Ralph Adams Cram building was dedicated in 1923. It was expanded in 1969 and 1997. The latter Childs, Burtman, & Tsecakres renovation essentially gutted the 1969 James F. Clapp addition. The library's history pages leaves one with the impression that the 1969 wing was not in character with the neoclassical architecture of Cram.

The postcard is likely contemporaneous with the original building.

Waltham

As a preservationist, I am torn about this library.
An 1679 house and tavern was torn down in 1913, and the Library built in 1914. Additions followed in 1933 and 1994.

 

Curt Teich 'C.T. American Art' card was mailed in 1916.

Ware (Young Men's Library Association)

The Library began as the eminently practical Mechanics and Manufacturers Library in 1828. The collection wended its way through several organizations, but the Young Men's Debating Society took the initiative to build a permanent home in 1879.
In 1881, the E.C. Gardner-designed building opened as a library.
Its website emphasizes that this was never a church.

 

This might be a Curt Teich product, judged only by its plate number.

Warren

Built in 1890. During much of this time, the second floor was never used. They had that extra space, albeit leaky, and now they still occupy this beautiful building.

 

A.E. Shumway/N.E. Paper & Stationery post card.

Watertown

Built of beautiful red stone and brick in 1884, and still in use.

(L) 1905 Rotograph postcard, never mailed.

(R) American Art Post Card, with less vegetation.

Wayland

1900 Samuel W. Mead building, of red brick. In 1988, the most recent addition was made.

 

Published by S.I. Russell; printed by the N.E. Paper & Stationery Company.

Webster

Built 1918-1921 from a Titan & Githens design, on a land donation from Augusta E. Corbin. However, the library is now known as the Gladys E. Kelly Library.

Although it's a difficult call, I believe this was printed in the 1960s by Merrimack Post Card.

Wellesley

Shaw & Hunnewell building, purportedly Romanesque with French Chateau features. Replaced in 2003. Still in use as the town hall.

 

Printed in Germany.

Westborough

This attractive building is still in use.

 

The sharp photo postcard was mailed in late 1907.

Westfield

Believed to be the Westfield Athenæum.

Proceeding on the assumption that this was the Athenaeum, this was the 1899 version: the second library building. Among the sources of its funding were monies from the president of the American Whip Company, and proceeds from the dog tax.

In 1927, this building became the 'Fowler-Gillett Homestead for the Boys and Girls Library.' It was expanded in 1966.

German postcard with an entire back.

Williamsburg (Meekins Library)

Still in use, with a 2003 addition.

 

Eastern Illustrating Co. card. There are some spiffy photo postcards from this firm.

Winchendon (Beals Memorial Library)

Still in use.

 

This is an American Art postcard, not to be confused with Curt Teich's 'C.T. American Art' line.

Winchester

Still in use. Built in 1931 with English Norman architecture by Kilham, Hopkins & Greeley. The same firm, plus Brodie, designed a 1966 addition. Reconstructed in 1996.

 

1968 Yankee Colour Card.

Woburn

This is the definitive H.H. Richardson Romanesque library, designed by the master architect himself. To do it justice, I would have to crib the entire library history page, and that's not happening.

 

German card, never mailed.

Worcester

Card by A.C. Bosselman.

 

The building is either demolished or remodeled into oblivion. Actually, I'm not 100 percent certain which building was the library. Either is an appropriate size.

There are three Carnegie buildings in Worcester. I have cards of none.

Salem Square

Built in 1964. Enlarged in 2001: still in use.

 

Card by Sommerfeld Photo Film: photo by Win Sommerfeld.

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©2015-2019  Judy Aulik
Contact me at (my first name) at roadmaps (dot) org.

 

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